The Online Mechanic

Automotive help for amateurs
Sep
04

 

 My rear transmission seal is leaking. How can I fix this myself?

All you need to do to change the rear trans seal in a rear wheel drive car is to remove the drive shaft and get something to pry the seal out.  A large screw driver will do.  On front wheel drive vechiles it is some what more complicated.  It would help to know what kind of vehicle you are driving.



Sep
04

 

 My rear transmission seal is leaking. How can I fix this myself?

All you need to do to change the rear trans seal in a rear wheel drive car is to remove the drive shaft and get something to pry the seal out.  A large screw driver will do.  On front wheel drive vechiles it is some what more complicated.  It would help to know what kind of vehicle you are driving.



Sep
04

 

 My rear transmission seal is leaking. How can I fix this myself?

All you need to do to change the rear trans seal in a rear wheel drive car is to remove the drive shaft and get something to pry the seal out.  A large screw driver will do.  On front wheel drive vechiles it is some what more complicated.  It would help to know what kind of vehicle you are driving.



Aug
26

I had a writer ask about the problem with oil slugg building up in Toyota’s V-6s.  My son is a Toyota Master Mechanic and he said that the problem is from lack of service and not a problem with the engine.  He said that if you service a Toyota V-6 as recommended you will not have any problems.



Aug
13

I got a neat e-mail from a blogger who had a clogged radiator.  He said that he blocked off the hose connections to the radiator and put a bottle of “The Works” bathroom toilet bowel cleaner in it and let it stand overnight.  Said it contains hydrocloric acid.  Said it cured his overheating problems.



Aug
12

I learned something new from one of my blogers.  If you go to autozone.com you can find the serpintine belt routing diagrams of several common vehicles.  They also have other good fix it yourself information.



Aug
06

Now, I have a question: I just bought a 1989 Mercury Tracer Sta. Wgn. It is overheating. On the open highway, it does not so much. But in town it slowly reaches boiling point.

A new water pump was put it just two years ago, so I doubt that this is the problem. The fans are all functioning properly. I just put a brand new thermostat in it–still kept overheating. It has a brand new, correct radiator cap. Coolant is at the right mixture. A shop just installed a new timing belt last year, so I don’t think it is jump timing.) I just got through retiming it, placing the timing at the manufacturers recommended mark, degree. (Seems the engine idles faster at this correct mark though.) I read the work order for the timing belt and the mechanic who replaced the timing belt suggested that the radiator may need rodded out. But it was left undone, I suppose because the previous owner did not want to sink more money into it. I did flush it out well, but still over heats. (The way I self tested to see if perhaps the radiator fins were clogged was this: 1. I drained the radiator 2. then I left the bottom drain valve wide open 3. I placed our garden hose in the radiator cap snout and turned it on full blast. A good pressurised stream of water issued from the wide open drain cock below, so I assume that the radiator fins are open and clear. But, perhaps not all of them are? If there are some open, then the pressurized hose water could possibly be diverted into the open rather than the shut ones? Does it sound like the radiator may be clogged? I would sure appreciate mutual help as diagnosing a car is the hardest part, the repairs being the easiest part.

 When the car has warmed up touch the radiator at different spots. If it is not uniformally warm and some areas are cooler than others then you could have a cloged radiator.

 



Aug
02

MY CAR STOPPED ON ME TODAY. WHEN I LOOKED UNDER THE HOOD THE TOW TRUCK GUY TOLD ME MY ALTERNATOR BELT BROKE. I HAVE A 1992 VOLVO 940 TURBO. I BOUGHT A NEW BELT BUT NO ONE I KNOW KNOWS HOW TO PUT IT ON TO FIX IT. CAN YOU PLEASE TELL ME HOW TO PUT IT ON STEP BY STEP AND WHAT KIND OF TOOLS DO I NEED.

THANK YOU SO MUCH,
LaTanya C.

The best thing to do is go to a local shop that has experience with your type of car and get them to give you an estimate on how much it will cost you to have the belt replaced. If I knew where you lived I could direct you to a shop.  You could also go to the library and see if they have a repair manual for your car.  Let me know what you do and if I can be of more help.

 

 



Aug
02

I have a 4×4 2000 ford explorer. When I put it in 4 wheel drive and turn a corner it whines really bad . I took it to 2 mechanics and they said they think it is ok. So I called the ford dealership and they said the same . What is you oppinion

The first thing that comes to mind is the outter u-joints on the front axle. There is also an inner u-joint on the right side.  Have these checked out.  They freeze up from rust and cause pressure on the front drive axle parts which can cause a whinning noise.  This is common to all 4x4s’ that use u-joints no matter what make of vehicle.



Apr
16

Ever had to pull over off the road and then pull back on and have a loud squeel come from your wheel. My son was traveling out to live with me and had pulled over to change drivers. When he pulled back on the road he heard a loud squeeling coming from his wheel. After pulling back off and jacking up his wheel he found that a small rock had gotten caught between his brake roter and the backing plate. During the years that I have been a mechanic I have run into this problem many times. The reason I am writing about it is that the sound is similar to a brake pad sgueel when your brakes are worn out. I would sugest that when you have your brakes checked, especially if they are squeeling that you get the mechanic to let you visually see the brake pads when he has the tire off. Could save you a few dollars.